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Would love to see an analysis of Beatrice and Benedick. Someone make a clever graph for Much Ado! The Oberon/Puck, Viola/Olivia stats don’t surprise me and are probably backed by some fanfic out there in the interwebs.

fuckyeahgreatplays:

FiveThirtyEight was surprised to find, via computer analysis, that Romeo and Juliet speak less to each other than to other characters.

I’m blaming Romeo for this lack of communication. Juliet speaks 155 lines to him, and he speaks only 101 to her. His reticence toward Juliet is particularly inexcusable when you consider that Romeo spends more time talking than anyone else in the play. (He spends only one-sixth of his time in conversation with the supposed love of his life.)
The plays with the most connected lovers seem to be the ones with strong women: “The Taming of the Shrew’s” fiery Katharina, “Macbeth’s” homicidal Lady Macbeth, “The Merchant of Venice’s” brilliant Portia, and “Antony and Cleopatra’s” seductive and defiant Cleopatra. In general, Shakespeare’s female lovers lavish a larger share of their lines on their men than the men do on them. This is true not just of “Romeo and Juliet,” but of “Macbeth,” “The Taming of the Shrew” and all four couples in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The only real exceptions, tellingly, occur in the plays where the women pose as men: “Twelfth Night” and “The Merchant of Venice.” (Antony and Cleopatra spend roughly equal shares of lines on each other.)

The whole article is a fascinating read. There’s even an nifty set of interactive graphs.
Would love to see an analysis of Beatrice and Benedick. Someone make a clever graph for Much Ado! The Oberon/Puck, Viola/Olivia stats don’t surprise me and are probably backed by some fanfic out there in the interwebs.

fuckyeahgreatplays:

FiveThirtyEight was surprised to find, via computer analysis, that Romeo and Juliet speak less to each other than to other characters.

I’m blaming Romeo for this lack of communication. Juliet speaks 155 lines to him, and he speaks only 101 to her. His reticence toward Juliet is particularly inexcusable when you consider that Romeo spends more time talking than anyone else in the play. (He spends only one-sixth of his time in conversation with the supposed love of his life.)

The plays with the most connected lovers seem to be the ones with strong women: “The Taming of the Shrew’s” fiery Katharina, “Macbeth’s” homicidal Lady Macbeth, “The Merchant of Venice’s” brilliant Portia, and “Antony and Cleopatra’s” seductive and defiant Cleopatra. In general, Shakespeare’s female lovers lavish a larger share of their lines on their men than the men do on them. This is true not just of “Romeo and Juliet,” but of “Macbeth,” “The Taming of the Shrew” and all four couples in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The only real exceptions, tellingly, occur in the plays where the women pose as men: “Twelfth Night” and “The Merchant of Venice.” (Antony and Cleopatra spend roughly equal shares of lines on each other.)

The whole article is a fascinating read. There’s even an nifty set of interactive graphs.

(via shakespearesaladstyle)

— 1 week ago with 1396 notes
#shakespeare  #reblog  #twelfth night  #The MErchant of Venice  #A Midsummer Night's Dream  #macbeth  #The Taming of the Shrew  #Antony and Cleopatra  #romeo and juliet 
BroadwayHD At The Movies: Romeo and Juliet →

Only just heard about this today. Apologies to US followers but it appears screenings in the US have passed. For those of you in Europe and Australia, screenings are coming soon. I hope this means more Broadway shows will be broadcast in cinemas around the world:

"Prejudice. Anger. Betrayal. And the chance that true love could actually conquer all. It could only be the greatest love story of all time…Filmed live on Broadway and starring the British actor Orlando Bloom (Pirates of the Caribbean, The Lord of the Rings) and two-time Tony Award nominee Condola Rashad, this dazzling new production of Romeo and Juliet is a modern take on one of Shakespeare’s best-loved plays. Staged on Broadway for the first time in 36 years, director David Leveaux brings a dynamic energy and contemporary setting to his interpretation of this eternally tragic tale of star-crossed lovers.”

— 1 month ago
#news  #romeo and juliet  #live  #broadway  #stage  #film  #performance  #orlando bloom  #condola rashad 
Salvador Dali - Romeo e Julia, Romeo and Juliet →

"A rare set of illustrations of Romeo and Juliet by surrealist painter Salvador Dali and Juliet have been discovered.

The work, dated from 1975, consists of 10 off-set lithographs on heavy paper with 99 pages of bound text contained in a red/burgundy silk slipcase.

The images have recently come to the wider public’s attention after one gallery - Lockport Street Gallery - placed book number 819 of 999 up for sale.”

I normally hate liking to the Daily Mail, but they seem to have all the pictures up. Click here for more info. and images.

— 2 months ago with 3 notes
#salvador dali  #romeo and juliet  #art  #news 

Digital Theatre has announced the expansion of the Digital Theatre Collections with four further productions from Shakespeare’s Globe now avialbale to rent, or to buy. The Shakespeare’s Globe Collection now includes Romeo and Juliet, Doctor Faustus, Love’s Labour’s Lost, As You Like It, Henry VIII, The Merry Wives of Windsor, and Henry IV parts 1 and 2

.

(Source: youtube.com)

— 6 months ago with 60 notes
#digital theatre  #video  #trailer  #stage  #performance  #the globe  #globe theatre  #romeo and juliet  #as you like it  #love's labour's lost  #doctor faustus  #the merry wives of windsor  #henry viii  #youtube  #Henry IV part 1  #henry iv part 2 
Romeo and Juliet – review | The Guardian →

So far I’ve only come across bad reviews for the new Romeo and Juliet film adaptation (which worries me, but seems to confirm the early suspicions I had about the project - I remember using the term Downton Verona - all style, little substance). Has anyone who follows me seen it yet? I’m wondering if it’s worth seeing it in the cinema, or if it’s a wait ‘til it hits DVD kind of film. In other news the folks at The Globe aren’t that happy with Julian Fellowes’s comments re: his adaptation of the language in the new film.

— 6 months ago with 4 notes
#film  #romeo and juliet  #review  #the globe  #globe theatre 

britishstageandscreen:

Peggy Ashcroft with her two Romeos: John Gielgud (top) and Laurence Olivier (bottom) in Romeo and Juliet at the New Theatre, 1935

— 6 months ago with 28 notes
#reblog  #photo  #romeo and juliet  #John Gieldgud  #Laurence Olivier  #stage  #performance 

britishstageandscreen:

John Gielgud and Laurence Olivier as rival Romeos in the 1935 production of Romeo and Juliet at the New Theatre, London. Photos by Cecil Beaton for British Vogue.

— 7 months ago with 43 notes
#John Gieldgud  #Laurence Olivier  #romeo and juliet  #photo  #reblog  #stage  #performance 
Wherefore art thou NOT Shakespeare? | Folger Shakespeare Library →

An interesting analysis of the adaptation of language in the trailer for the upcoming Romeo and Juliet film, adapted for the screen by Julian Fellowes.

— 8 months ago with 13 notes
#romeo and juliet  #film  #Folger Shakespeare Library 
Philip Hermogenes Calderon
Juliet (1888)
Colored lithograph, size approximately 8.5 x 11 inches 
Graphic, a weekly London newspaper.
The weekly newspaper the Graphic commissioned twenty-one studies of Shakespeare’s heroines that were exhibited in London in 1888.

farewellophelia:

Juliet Capulet by Philip Hermogenes Calderon
Philip Hermogenes Calderon
Juliet (1888)
Colored lithograph, size approximately 8.5 x 11 inches
Graphic, a weekly London newspaper.

The weekly newspaper the Graphic commissioned twenty-one studies of Shakespeare’s heroines that were exhibited in London in 1888.

farewellophelia:

Juliet Capulet by Philip Hermogenes Calderon

— 8 months ago with 37 notes
#romeo and juliet  #art  #Philip Hermogenes Calderon  #reblog